Staffordshire bull terrier has ‘miracle’ life-saving surgery #dailymail β€οΈπŸ’Ÿβ€οΈ

Staffordshire bull terrier has ‘miracle’ life-saving surgery after eating SIX bags of Christmas chocolate coins

  • Hugo, a six-year-old Staffordshire bull terrier, ate six bags of chocolate coins
  • Owner Amie, from Plymouth, returned home from shopping to find the chocolate gone
  • Six-year-old pooch needed life-saving surgery at the Plymouth PDSA hospital
  • Did YOUR dog eat the Christmas food or destroy presents? Email [email protected]


A Staffordshire bull terrier had ‘miracle’ life-saving surgery after he ate six bags of Christmas chocolate coins.

Amie, who owns six-year-old Hugo, had popped to the shops only to return to find all of her chocolate gone and wrappers strewn on the floor of her home in Plymouth, Devon.

The dog was vomiting blood and then had a seizure so Amie rang PDSA for advice.

Hugo was taken to the PDSA pet hospital in the town where vets took the decision to operate to save his life, as chocolate can be lethal to dogs and the foil was an additional danger.

Pictured: Some of the wrappers which were strewn on the floor when Amie returned home

Amie, who owns six-year-old Hugo (pictured left) had popped to the shops only to return to find all of her chocolate gone and wrappers strewn on the floor of her home in Plymouth, Devon

Amie said the PDSA treatment was a ‘Christmas miracle’ for Hugo and said: ‘I’d only been to the shops briefly and came back to find torn-up packets and bits of foil all over the floor, with the chocolate gone.

‘At first Hugo seemed fine, but I felt sick with worry when he began vomiting blood. He then had a seizure which was terrifying, so I called PDSA immediately.’

The PDSA hospital assessed and sedated Hugo where he also had an X-ray.

The six-year-old dog (pictured) was assessed and sedated at a PDSA hospital nearby. His stomach was found to be full of foil

The six-year-old dog (pictured) was assessed and sedated at a PDSA hospital nearby. His stomach was found to be full of foil

Pictured: Hugo. He is now on the road to recovery after his surgery at the PDSA hospital

Pictured: Hugo. He is now on the road to recovery after his surgery at the PDSA hospital

Dog owners admit to feeding their pooches human leftovers

A third of dogs are fed festive tit bits and leftovers

And 47 per cent of dog-owners admit they give their pooch leftovers from takeaways

One in ten (nine per cent) polish off puddings

Over half (52 per cent) of owners believe their dog prefers human food to their own

Two in five British dog owners (40 per cent) admit they feed their dog human food

Almost a fifth (19 per cent) have no idea about the potential health risks

And 61 percent don’t know what they should be feeding their dog for the best health benefits

Almost half (47 percent) are unsure about ingredients to look out for when they do purchase dog food

One in twenty (six percent) admit they don’t know what they should be feeding their dogs

Almost a quarter (24 percent) of the dog owners polled confess that they share snacks with their dogs

16 percent admit that feeding their dog scraps of human food has led to them putting on weight

A further 34 percent say that giving their dog leftovers has played some part in their pooch piling on the pounds

Over half of the UK’s dog owners (57 percent) say they love to treat their furry friend to human food because they think they love it

Three in ten admit they hate throwing away leftover food

The research also found that 23 percent even feel GUILTY if they don’t share some of their food with their pup.

Source: ACANA

It was found that Hugo’s stomach was full of foil and he needed surgery to remove it.

PDSA vet nurse Donna Southwould said: ‘Hugo was kept in overnight after his major surgery.

‘He needed an intravenous fluid drip, medication and intensive nursing care to aid his recovery.

‘He was very lucky, and could have died if he had not been treated in time.

‘While he’s not completely out of the woods yet, thankfully Hugo is now at home on strict rest, and on the road to recovery.’

The vet nurse advised owners to be careful with festive treats around their pets and said: ‘Many of us have treats, sweets and chocolates aplenty in the house, and while the festive period can be a time for indulgence, it’s important to remember that some of these foods are very harmful to our pets.

‘Foods including chocolate, mince pies, onions, raisins, grapes, some nuts, sage-and-onion stuffing and Christmas cake can all be harmful and should be kept safely out of paws’ reach.

‘Instead of extra food, why not try giving your pets some extra playtime over Christmas?’

Amie said: ‘I don’t know what I would have done without the incredibly kind and caring staff at PDSA – they were amazing.

I honestly don’t think Hugo would be here without them.

‘They went above and beyond for him and I will be forever grateful.

‘There were a number of times I thought we were going to lose him, so to have him home for Christmas is a miracle.’

A PDSA spokeswoman said: ‘If you think your pet might have eaten something they shouldn’t, call your vet immediately as they might need urgent treatment.’

Amie said: ‘I don’t know what I would have done without the incredibly kind and caring staff at PDSA – they were amazing.

‘I honestly don’t think Hugo would be here without them.

‘They went above and beyond for him and I will be forever grateful.

‘There were a number of times I thought we were going to lose him, so to have him home for Christmas is a miracle.’

A PDSA spokeswoman said: ‘If you think your pet might have eaten something they shouldn’t, call your vet immediately as they might need urgent treatment.’

Advertisement

Staffordshire bull terrier has ‘miracle’ life-saving surgery

Get link

xoonews.com

websitetrafficnews.com